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September 2019

Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Heedeok Hong: “Folding and degradation of membrane proteins”

September 25 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Heedeok Hong Department of Chemistry Michigan State University Title: "Folding and degradation of membrane proteins" Abstract: The functional integrity of cellular proteomes is maintained by a delicate balance between protein folding and degradation. While a majority of studies on these two connected problems have focused on water-soluble proteins, it is not well understood how membrane proteins fold and how they are degraded in cells. The knowledge gap mainly stems from inherent difficulties in studying membrane protein folding in a…

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October 2019

Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Gregg Howe:”Molecular mechanism of jasmonate signaling: new insights into the dilemma of plants to grow or defend”

October 2 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Gregg Howe Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Michigan State University Title: "Molecular mechanism of jasmonatae signaling: new insights into the dilemma of plants to grow or defend" Abstract: The plant hormone jasmonate coordinates immune and growth responses to increase plant survival in unpredictable environments. The potency with which jasmonate both promotes defense and simultaneously inhibits growth implies a broader role for the hormone in controlling resource allocation to various physiological tasks. In this seminar, I will first describe…

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Biochemistry Seminar/ Reinhart Seminar Series- Dr. Carlos Bustamante: “Co-translational Protein Folding One Molecular at a Time””

October 9 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Reinhart seminar series UC Berekeley/Howard Hughes Med. Inst. Host: Hays Rye Abstract: Proteins are synthesized by the ribosome and generally must fold to become functionally active. Although it is commonly assumed that the ribosome affects the folding process, this idea has been extremely difficult to demonstrate. We optical tweezers to investigate the folding of single ribosome-bound stalled nascent polypeptides of T4 lysozyme synthesized in a reconstituted in vitro translation system. Significantly, we find that the ribosome slows the formation of…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Bryan Shaw: “Measuring and manipulating the net charge of proteins – what have we been missing?””

October 16 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States

Dr. Bryan Shaw Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Baylor University Title: "Measuring and manipulating the net charge of proteins - what have we been missing?" Abstract: Most biochemists show little interest in measuring the net electrostatic charge (Z) of folded proteins at pHpI, that is, in determining values of Z that not only account for anomalous pKa’s but also include tightly bound metal ions, cofactors, solvent or buffer ions. Our disregard for this fundamental parameter has impeded a rigorous understanding…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Petr Leiman:”Function, structure, and evolution of phage spike tip proteins”

October 23 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Petr Leiman Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston Title: "Function, structure, and evolution of phage spike tip proteins" Abstract:The process of protein and DNA translocation across lipid membranes is central to the function of any organism. Contractile injection systems, which include bacteriophage tails, Type VI Secretion System, R-type pyocins, Photorhabdus Virulence Cassette, Serratia antifeeding prophage, and others, translocate their substrates using a rigid tube/contractile sheath…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Amanda Haes : “Nanoparticles and SERS – To Stability and Beyond!”

October 30 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Amanda Haes Department of Chemistry University of Iowa Title: "Nanoparticles and SERS – To Stability and Beyond!" Abstract: Anisotropic nanostructures such as gold nanostars exhibit large surface energies relative to spheres or larger structures, thus flocculation and restructuring over time are likely. Restructuring, for instance, most likely occurs at regions of high surface free energy such as those at the nanostar tips because of their small radius of curvatures. As such, the tips on gold nanostars can dissolve more…

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November 2019

Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Alexander Mankin: “Stopping the ribosome at the finish line: how PrAMPs inhibit termination of translation”

November 6 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Alexander Mankin Center for Biomolecular Sciences University of Illinois at Chicago Title: "Stopping the ribosome at the finish line: how PrAMPs inhibit termination of translation" Abstract:Apidaecin (Api), produced by honeybees, belongs to the class of proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs), which protect the host from bacterial infection. Api has a unique mode of action and stops bacteria from growing by inhibiting the termination step of translation. Biochemical, genetic and genomic analyses show that the action of Api is distinct from…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Igor Jouline :”How novel sensors arise in bacteria”

November 13 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Igor Jouline Department of Microbiology The Ohio State University Title:"How novel sensors arise in bacteria" Abstract: Bacteria possess various receptors that monitor changes in the environment and help adjusting cellular functions accordingly. The number of receptors in bacterial genomes varies significantly and different bacterial species seem to evolve unique receptor proteins. Where do these novel receptors come from? Here, I will consider several basic mechanisms for their birth, using bacterial chemoreceptors as a model. In the first example, I…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Suzanne McDermott: “TBA”

November 20 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Suzanne McDermott Center for Global Infectious Disease Research Seattle Children's Research Institute Title: "TBA" Abstract: Host: Jorge Cruz-Reyes 108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507)

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March 2020

Biochemistry Seminar – Dr. Sheng Luan: “TBA”

March 4, 2020 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Sheng Luan Department of Plant & Microbial Biology University of California, Berkeley Title:"TBA" Abstract: Host: Ping He 108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg#1507)

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