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February 2018

Biochemistry Seminar – Peter Tessier : “Improved methods for designing, evolving and characterizing monoclonal antibodies”

February 28 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Peter Tessier Department of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutical Sciences University of Michigan Title: "Improved methods for designing, evolving and characterizing monoclonal antibodies" Abstract: The biotech industry has seen an explosion in the development of therapeutic antibodies in the last decade, and today most of the top selling drugs are monoclonal antibodies. The advantages of antibodies as therapeutics – namely their high affinity, specificity, potency, stability, manufacturability and low toxicity – are compelling. Nevertheless, there are many fundamental challenges associated…

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March 2018

Biochemistry Seminar – Miriam Greenberg :”TBA”

March 7 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Miriam Greenberg Department of Biological Sciences Wayne State University Title: "TBA" Abstract:   Host: Vishal Gohil Location: 108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg#1507)

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Biochemistry Seminar – Wolfgang Peti : “Using NMR spectroscopy to unravel enzyme function”

March 21 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Wolfgang Peti Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Arizona Title: "Using NMR spectroscopy to unravel enzyme function" Abstract: Protein function originates from a cooperation of structural rigidity, dynamics at different timescales and allostery. However, how these three pillars of protein function are integrated is still only poorly understood. Here we show how these pillars are connected in phosphorylation enzymes, specifically the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B and the serine/threonine kinase p38. A broad array of molecular tools are necessary…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Chris Welch :“High Throughput Analysis and High Throughput Experimentation in Pharmaceutical Development ”

March 28 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Chris Welch Welch Innovation, LLC Title: “High Throughput Analysis and High Throughput Experimentation in Pharmaceutical Development ” Abstract: Recent years have seen a fundamental shift in research strategies for the development and commercialization of new medicines, from a slower ‘one-at-a-time’ handcrafted approach to the widespread adoption of high throughput research methodologies. An overview of recent progress in this field is presented, with case histories illustrating how diverse areas of research such as synthetic route discovery and optimization, enzyme evolution…

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April 2018

Biochemistry Seminar – Jung-Hyun Min : “Structure and dynamics of DNA damage recognition by Rad4 nucleotide excision repair protein complex”

April 4 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Jung-Hyun Min Department of Chemistry University of Illinois, Chicago Title: "Structure and dynamics of DNA damage recognition by Rad4 nucleotide excision repair protein complex" Abstract: DNA damage repair is central to maintaining the genome integrity and preventing cancer. The first step in DNA damage repair is the recognition of damaged sites from predominantly normal DNA. This task is especially formidable for the nucleotide excision repair (NER) which repairs structurally diverse lesions caused by various genotoxic sources such as UV…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Hamed Jafar-Nejad : “O-glucose glycans in animals development and human disease”

April 11 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Hamed Jafar-Nejad Molecular & Human Genetics Baylor College of Medicine Title: "O-glucose glycans in animal development and human disease" Abstract: Glycosylation is one of the most common forms of posttranslational modification found on proteins from all species studied so far. In addition to structural roles, glycans regulate many aspects of animal development and physiology. For example, the receptors and ligands of the evolutionarily conserved Notch signaling pathway are decorated with several forms of O-linked glycans, which regulate the activity…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Alex Evilevitch : “Herpesvirus infectivity facilitated by internal DNA pressure and capsid stability”

April 18 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Alex Evilevitch Department of Pathobiology University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Title: "Herpesvirus infectivity facilitated by internal DNA pressure and capsid stability" Abstract: Herpesviruses are a leading cause of human viral disease, second only to influenza and cold viruses. Herpesviruses consist of a double-stranded (ds) DNA genome contained within a protein shell, termed the capsid, that is surrounded by an unstructured protein layer (the tegument) and a lipid-envelope. During viral replication, an ATP-dependent motor packages the genome into a preformed…

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Biochemistry Seminar – Walter Chazin :”Functional Dynamics of Modular Multi-Domain Proteins”

April 25 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
108 Biochemistry Building (Bldg.#1507), 300 Olsen Blvd
College Station, TX 77845 United States
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Dr. Walter Chazin Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry Vanderbilt University Title: "Functional Dynamics of Modular Multi-Domain Proteins" Abstract: Fundamental processes driving the operation, propagation, and maintenance of cells are carried out by multi-protein machines.  Machines require moving parts and in the case of protein machinery, the movement of the machine’s parts is enabled by making the constituent proteins modular, linking multiple globular domains together with flexible tethers.  Flexibility between domains in these proteins is critical to the movement between the…

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