Lanying Zeng
Lanying Zeng
Assistant Professor
BioBio / Room 419A
lzeng@tamu.edu
979-845-2961
Ph.D University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2007)

Postdoc University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2007-2011)
Joined Texas A&M in 2012

Cellular Decision Making in Bacteria

Living systems make decisions driven by the information from the environment. This decision-making process has the duality nature characterized by stochasticity and determinism. Recently, considerable efforts have been put towards understanding the sources and characteristics of cell-fate heterogeneity as a result of stochastic gene expression. Nevertheless, the development of a living organism is a highly precise coordination. Our primary goal is to achieve a deeper understanding of the roles played by the stochasticity and determinism within living organisms at the systems level, which is crucial for our understanding of the dynamics of biological systems. As a starting point, we chose as our model system a paradigmatic system of gene regulation and one of the simplest dynamical systems in biology, namely, the decision made by the <i>E. coli</i> bacteria after infection by the virus phage lambda.

Work in the lab has multidisciplinary facets involving experimental techniques of molecular and cell biology, live-cell and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy for quantitative measurements, quantitative data analysis, relatively simple mathematical modelling, etc.

 

Recent Publications

  1. Zeng, L, Golding, I (2011) Following cell-fate in E. coli after infection by phage lambda. J Vis Exp : e3363
  2. Rothenberg, E, Sepúlveda, LA, Skinner, SO, Zeng, L, Selvin, PR, Golding, I (2011) Single-virus tracking reveals a spatial receptor-dependent search mechanism. Biophys. J. 100: 2875-82
  3. Zeng, L, Skinner, SO, Zong, C, Sippy, J, Feiss, M, Golding, I (2010) Decision making at a subcellular level determines the outcome of bacteriophage infection. Cell 141: 682-91
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